Anya Hindmarch’s leather stickers? They embody digital culture
By Sara McCorquodale

They’re up to £125 a pop and have made the designer £12m in two seasons. So what’s the appeal of Anya Hindmarch’s leather stickers? WGSN Senior Editor Sara McCorquodale has a few ideas

Jul 29, 2015
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They’re small, not cheap and you sort of need something cool to attach them to if they’re to look genuinely great.

Yet Anya Hindmarch’s luxury stickers are doing a roaring trade – a £12million-in-two-seasons type of trade – off the back of 300,000 orders.

Speaking to Business of Fashion, the British designer said: “We opened a store in Westfield this week and a woman came in yesterday and chose a handbag and six stickers — and right there, in the store, we stickered up her bag. That’s really what it’s all about.”

So why are luxury stickers – preposterous in theory when you really think about it – selling out? It’s not that need to get a piece of a brand through buying something – anything – that has an affordable price point. These are not Anya Hindmarch‘s answer to Gucci sunglasses or Calvin Klein pants.

No, these cartoon-ish appendages are extraordinary because they perfectly sum digital culture today – a mash up of emojis and nostalgia that manage to embody a sense of pop art while they’re at it. 

They take us back to playground swagger, doodling on jotters and customising lives and looks, pre-digital, pre-fast fashion when individualism was more rustically attained. We gravitate towards these vintage ideas, motifs and behaviours and feel united by them. Need evidence? Check out 70% of Buzzfeed’s content (sample headline: “Which 90s movie persona are you based on these three questions?”)

And yet, it’s not just nostalgia-driven. The stickers are basically physical emojis, and isn’t that our global language in 2015? They let consumers dip into the world of smileys and slogan t-shirts without actually wearing a winky face across their chest. Because while that look may not really work in an office or an actual life after, say, the age of 25, a sticker is completely acceptable. A small but discerning nod to knowing and being part of what’s going on.

Who knew a simple sticker could achieve and embody so much? Anya Hindmarch obviously – clever woman.

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