One and Only by Fabrica for L’ArcoBaleno
By Sarah Housley

Italian design research centre Fabrica has created a collection of nine objects for online design platform L’ArcoBaleno. Designed by the centre’s current team of young …

Nov 27, 2014
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Italian design research centre Fabrica has created a collection of nine objects for online design platform L’ArcoBaleno. Designed by the centre’s current team of young designers and made entirely in Europe, the One and Only collection includes a vase that must be cracked in two, a mirror that creates an optical illusion, a box of secrets and a burnt table.

Pascal Hien‘s Division Vase is sold to its owner unfinished; they must make the final step in the design process themselves by breaking it in two in the middle, creating a pair of marble vases.

Federico Floriani‘s Centrum Fugere lockbox hides its true function by appearing to be a tabletop marble sculpture; only its owner knows the secret way to open it and access the treasures they’ve stored inside.

Giorgia Zanellato‘s Natura Morta with Parrot translates the traditional elements of the still life painting into 3D form, with handmade ceramic.

Maybe, a wall sculpture by Catarina Carreiras, is inspired by traditional Sardinian bread sculptures, and is composed of a material made from bread. Bird and flower forms within the sculpture together form the word “yes”; the wall hanging is intended as a good luck charm and message of hope for wherever it’s placed.

Dean Brown‘s Makeshift Tray brings together artisanal and industrial materials, contrasting hewn wood with folded sheet aluminium. The tray can be used to store and display fruit, vegetables, desk accessories or odds and ends.

Fabrica’s creative director, Sam Baron, has contributed Attaches Moi, a decorative bow for the interior made of wrought iron.

Japanese designer Tomomi Maezawa has hand-painted the Narcissus Mirror with angular black and white patterns, transforming each viewer’s reflection into an optical illusion.

Ferréol Babin‘s Ombre side table brings a blackened, charred finish to a pared-back wooden form. Using a traditional Japanese technique to burn the wood, Babin highlights each knot, crack and dent in the material’s surface.

Homebuildlife subscribers can find further reading in our interviews with Fabrica founder Sam Baron and designer Giorgia Zanellato, and our Experience Design analysis from Milan Design Week 2014.

– Sarah Housley


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