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The Future of Athleisure and Sustainability According to ADAY

New York technical clothing brand ADAY is revolutionising women’s wardrobes. The clothes that ADAY produce are frontrunners of the Athleisure trend – a longstanding hot topic for WGSN’S Active team.

Through a design ethos based on season-less pieces and sustainability, the company is producing hardworking, versatile styles that embody the ‘less-is-more’ approach. Using hi-tech materials that embody qualities such as thermoregulation (to keep you warm or cool while working out) and wicking (to keep you dry), ADAY offers a ‘lifewear’ wardrobe solution that can be worn from barre to the bar, without looking like gym clothes.

Following the launch of their new collection Multiplicity, we caught up with the founders, Meg He and Nina Faulhaber, to learn more about ADAY and their views on where everyday apparel is heading.

 

ADAY

Encouraging consumers to buy less could seem like a counterintuitive business strategy, what inspired you to take this approach?

Nina: We’re all about simple yet functional staples and, for us, quality wins over quantity. That doesn’t mean we don’t want people to buy: we do believe in investing in quality and versatility and we are continuously pushing the boundaries to deliver on that proposition. With our latest collection Multiplicity, we’ve learned from what our customers loved and are offering more.

We imagined pieces so versatile, they would replace the entire contents of your wardrobe. Each new design is made from fabrics that work harder, last longer and feel incredible. A single piece can be worn in multiple ways, proving that quality wins over quantity.

How do you envision the future of fashion retail?

Meg: Staples and functionality will become more popular in the future of fashion which in turn changes the way people shop. A larger share of wallet will go to repeat purchases and consumers are becoming more keen on the idea that their clothing needs to serve a larger purpose.

How do you maintain the balance between creativity and sustainability?

Nina: Designing sustainability is an incredibly creative challenge. To us, true creativity isn’t about colors and prints. It’s about creating aesthetically beautiful clothing with well thought through design lines whilst also applying certain restrictions such as using staple colors and embedding functionality and comfort.

How has your background in sport influenced your designs?

Nina: I grew up as a gymnast and competed in Germany. Meg completed her yoga teacher training in California. As a child getting dressed was always easy and all my clothing was comfortable – mainly because I spent most of my time in tracksuits and Nike sweatshirts. As a grown up though clothing wasn’t simple anymore. When Meg and I decided to explore how we could combine breathable fabrics and technical construction with a beautiful simple aesthetic we tapped deeply into our experience in sports. We investigated the most breathable, technical yet sustainable fabrics, and we designed garments that used Olympic garment construction technology to be the best possible garments they could be.

What does athleisure mean to you?

Meg: Athleisure is going through a big evolution – moving from stretch and comfort to contemporary daywear that still has the technology found in activewear, but is inseparable from the rest of our wardrobes. As the technology improves, at ADAY, we have always believed design will become as important (if not more so) than the technical aspects. This will be the next evolution of athleisure and probably won’t be called athleisure 2.0 since it’s much more a technology revolution for the apparel industry in general.

Do you think women are changing the way they dress?

Meg: Absolutely, I think that nowadays women are really looking to pieces and brands that combine fashion and function. They’re looking for clothing that fits in their daily lives rather than ones that they have to make fit into their life.

What impact would you like to see ADAY have on women’s wardrobes?

Nina: The millennial woman has a strong preference to spend her money on experiences versus things. That’s why our design philosophy is to design for versatility and longevity. Investing in functional garments means getting more out of your wardrobe, investing in higher quality and long-lasting pieces eliminates the need to replace the wardrobe every season. We love that our clothing can have this kind of societal impact. We’re not against consumerism, yet we believe the future belongs to a conscious consumer.

ADAY

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  • 400ppmFashion

    Love the aesthetic and the design philosophy, and I’m happy to see more brands openly talking about quality and investment as a sustainability strategy- albeit with the onus on the consumer to buy in to it. “Investing in functional garments means getting more out of your wardrobe, investing in higher quality and long-lasting pieces eliminates the need to replace the wardrobe every season.”– yet, how do we address the psychological need for novelty, which is what got us into this hot fast fas

  • Ethical Eco Fashion

    It’s great to see more and more emerging brands focusing on sustainability as much as atheistic side of the business. We work to promote brands like these, encouraging people to live better and be the change!

  • Beth

    While they’re clothing is indeed inspired, all this is worth nothing because the haven’t invested in cusotomer service. Emails go unanswered, phones ring and aren’t answered, refunds and returns aren’t taken care of. Stay away from Aday.

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