Frieze Art Fair New York 2014
By Gemma Riberti

Frieze New York returned at the weekend with its 3rd edition, once again hosted in a big white tent on Randall Park Island, offering …

May 13, 2014
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Frieze New York returned at the weekend with its 3rd edition, once again hosted in a big white tent on Randall Park Island, offering five days of exciting events and fairs.

This year Frieze – the most international art event in New York – hosted more that 190 contemporary art galleries, representing 28 different countries. The fair welcomed a combination of world-renowned galleries alongside emerging and young talents, for an intense schedule of visual art, engaging performances, fascinating talks and educational programs.

For those who still had energy, New York offered a concurrent program of art and design events around the city including NADA, Collective 2 Design Fair, Pulse Contemporary Art Fair, Cutlog, Outsider Art Fair as well as the opening of Damien Hirst’s Other Criteria – his first US retail store.

Danh Vo at Marian Goodman

 

For this edition, the fair saw a growing number of solo presentations where galleries decided to dedicate all their space to single talents. Among others, art dealer Marian Goodman devoted her wall space to Berlin-based Vietnamese artist Danh Vo to present his artwork, which consisted of a group of cardboard pieces, decorated with gold leaf-effect American flags and Coca-Cola logos suspended from the ceiling. Another example, London’s Wilkinson Gallery devoted its entire space to avant-garde artist Joan Jonas, showcasing works from the 1960s. The artist has also recently been chosen to represent the US at the next Venice Biennale 2015.

Berta Fischer

 

Other artists we particularly appreciated included; Berlin-based Berta Fischer who presented examples of colorful and voluminous sculptures in acrylic glass; Yayoi Kusama with a giant polka-dot-covered pumpkin sculpture that was instagrammed by nearly everyone that passed by; Simon Fujiwara showcasing a terracotta army adapted to the present day, re-imagined as teenage girls from London’s riots in 2011; Paris-based Xavier Veilhan with his mirror polished stainless sculpture; and Argentinian/Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija with a multimedia work of art, inspired by Gericault’s The Art of the Medusa painting at the Louvre. Consistent with the two previous years, Frieze returned with its Frame and Focus sections for art-fair newcomers and emerging galleries.

Yayoi Kusama at David Zwirner

Simon Fujiwara

 

Rirkrit Tiravanija at Gavin Brown

Must-see projects and talks included the highly anticipated conversation between Pussy Riot’s members Masha Alekhina and Nadya Tolokonnikova and The New Yorker Editor David Remnik regarding their recently launched Zona Prava, an NGO advocating prison reform. Another remarkable project was Al’s Grand Hotel, a revival and tribute to Allan Ruppersberg’s legendary hospitality project realized in 1971 in LA. At the time, the fully functional and operational hotel was open for six weeks and acted as a gathering location. The remake, created in collaboration with Public Fiction, consisted of four operative rooms starting from $350 a night. The immersive and surreal walk-in installation existed for the whole duration of the fair. Another engaging experience, involved artist Marie Lorenz and her Tide & Current Taxi Project, which offered visitors a ride on her handmade rowboat taxi providing an alternative transportation to the fair or just a tour on the Harlem River.

Al’s Grand Hotel by Public Fiction

Tide & Current Taxi Project by Marie Lorenz

 

For more information on the fair, please visit the official website. – Vittoria Toffoli


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