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Bryan Blue plays zeitgeist with his new zine

In the ever-evolving world of media, print publications have easily taken the biggest hit. This year alone has seen the fall of the great Interview Magazine amongst others and today we’re unconsciously consuming more information than any of us are prepared for. But, in this digital world the lost art of the “zine” is still alive and well – Ask the 8 Ball Community.

While most magazines, both digital and print, tend to pile on the ads and sponsored content, zines are almost always filled with passion, telling one’s story which can be intimate and often thought-provoking in nature.

LA Based Artist Bryan Blue, known to many as Blue the Great has launched his latest zine last weekend. The mini publication dubbed: UnFun Vol. II is the second of installment of the UnFun zine and includes his street photography, writings, a fold out poster and an illustration.

 

As a muralist and painter, Blue’s work can be can be seen in Public spaces and walls across the country but UnFun Vol. II shows his art in a more tangible and accessible way. The zine was released this past Friday at Bodega’s newest shop and guests were treated to a DJ Set by Chuck Inglish of the Cool Kids.

We were able to catch up with Blue for his thoughts on being a modern artist.

 

In 50 words or less, with as little art jargon as possible, explain what it is that you do…

I am an Artist – I guess professionally, now. I paint for a living and sell canvases mostly. Sometimes I take photos of real life. Like people being people as opposed to positioning people, but I’m working on growing as a photographer but I know that comes with time.

 

What do you think the future of zines / print media is?

I think there is a huge lane for zines seeing that most things are seen strictly through digital. Mostly on phones. Scale has to be experienced in person. Like seeing a painting, even in a zine is still limited but better than 1035×1080 pixels. Print is definitely on the downturn, but makes for great keepsakes.

 

What’s the biggest challenge you face when creating Public Art (Murals)?

The biggest challenge I face in painting public murals really is coming up with the concept. Which at times can be easy and sometimes challenging. Like I like to paint art from a very emotional place sometimes which may not be the best for murals. I feel like it almost needs to be a little shiny. Like making a song for the radio almost… lol. but not cheesy though. I don’t do too many murals but I love painting as big as I can.

 

What is the one piece of advice you would impart to other creatives?

The biggest advice I would give to other creatives is to stay ugly. Like keep making art that looks like you made it as opposed to chasing someone else’s style. It’s cool to be influenced but your work should recognized as your work. It should feel like you.

 

Why stop here? Check out WGSN’s Shelfie: Summer 2018 for this season’s ultimate reading list.

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