Art Everywhere: Britain’s Largest Art Show
By Gemma Riberti

For the next two weeks, a brilliant new initiative will see artworks displayed on thousands of billboards across the UK, turning the country into a large-scale, outdoor public art exhibition.

Aug 13, 2013
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For the next two weeks, a brilliant new initiative will see artworks displayed on thousands of billboards across the UK, turning the country into a large-scale, outdoor public art exhibition.

Art Everywhere is the collaborative effort of Richard Reed, co-founder of drinks brand Innocent, Art Fund and Tate.

Artworks (spanning 15th century masterpieces through to modern day contemporary works) have been voted for by members of the public and will appear across a number of advertising poster sites, such as buses, taxicabs, the London Underground and large billboards. According to Art Fund, the project will be seen by nearly 90% of the UK’s adult population.

“It’s a nourishing, exciting surprise to see art where you wouldn’t expect to see it. This is one of the few ways left of reaching everyone in the country at the same time,” explains Reed.

Adding a further layer of interactivity to the project, members of the public will be able to download the augmented reality app Blippar and access artwork information using their smartphones devices. Read our report Museums Without Walls, which explores the new ways consumers are viewing art in the digital age.

Art Everywhere runs until August 25, 2013. – Samantha Fox

Tacita Dean

Patrick Caulfield

Bridget Riley

Rose Finn-Kelcey

Peter Doig

David Hockney


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