Are fashion brands prepped to forego quality in order to fulfill the wants of Snapchat?
By Rachel Arthur

Something is happening with social media content. Where once highly pristine images made all the more perfect with an Instagram filter were a sure-fire strategic win, what’s beginning to take over with younger generations and the early adopter set is a much more candid approach to documenting a moment in time.

May 08, 2015
/

Like

Something is happening with social media content. Where once highly pristine images made all the more perfect with an Instagram filter were a sure-fire strategic win, what’s beginning to take over with younger generations and the early adopter set is a much more candid approach to documenting a moment in time.

From Snapchat to Periscope (and all the other live streaming apps in between), there’s much more of a raw aesthetic filling our content feeds. It’s unedited, unscripted, totally of the moment, and more authentic as a result. As Lucie Greene, worldwide director at J. Walter Thompson Intelligence, explains, it’s part of a consumer shift in terms of what is deemed acceptable with visual language.

Image via Stolnik Magazine

“We’re seeing intimate, real, and even amateur style photography becoming aspirational. And consumers, meanwhile, becoming active creators of content. They’re even starting to see themselves increasingly as their own brand. What’s interesting is that traditional entertainers and fashion brands are embracing this — they’re moving from slick, glossy, synthesised content to more ‘real’ looking imagery,” she says.

Inevitably it’s a big shift for the majority of brands however. In the fashion industry particularly, this more organic form of content is at odds with the increasingly strict controls in place around social media output. For many brands, content is created months in advance. For the giants in the space able to be more flexible, there are large teams and significant creative budgets in order to produce such flawless assets.

Those doing a really nice job of it however (on Snapchat check out Burberry, Valentino and Everlane), are still remaining ‘on brand’ with their output, just with a slightly more lighthearted view. Check out the full report on WGSN to read all about what they’re doing to achieve it, and how true interaction will be the next leap forward in this space.


Subscribe to WGSN

blog_ad6
Experience the leading provider of consumer foresight.

Related stories

4 photos
Why are your favourite fast food joints now stocking candles?

1 photo
Designers Maxwell Osborne and Dao-Yi Chow out of DKNY

9 photos
Canal Street Market Is Changing the Retail Landscape of Downtown Manhattan

3 photos
eBay's latest retail pop-up tracks shoppers emotions on camera

2 photos
5 Things We Learned About Black Friday This Year - As Told By The Data