A New Language: Multi-Touch Gestures
By Gemma Riberti

Commenting on current methods for communication, Royal College of Art student Gabriele Meldaikyte is examining our physical relationship with smartphones in latest project Multi-Touch Gestures.

Jan 17, 2013
/

Like

Commenting on current methods for communication, Royal College of Art student Gabriele Meldaikyte is examining our physical relationship with smartphones in her recent project Multi-Touch Gestures.

Meldaikyte has distilled the five gestures that form the language of communication between the tips of our fingers and the screens of our iPhones — tap, scroll, flick, swipe and pinch — into a series of 3-D tactile objects.

The objects are made using acrylic plastic and wood. Miniature levers and pulleys enable the user to navigate through newspaper clippings, miniature book pages and maps, which represent the applications and data stored on our phones.

“Nowadays, finger gestures are considered to be ‘signatures’ of the Apple iPhone. I believe that in 10 years or so these gestures will completely change. Therefore, my aim is to perpetuate them so they become accessible for future generations,” explains Meldaikyte, who sees the project as a memory capsule for future generations.

Our relationship with our digital technology is becoming progressively more tactile and intimate. Read out reports In The Air: Digital Gluttony and Catalyst: Issue 01, 2014 for examples of haptic desire and digital gluttony.


Subscribe to WGSN

ad_banner1
Experience Lifestyle & Interiors on WGSN.

Related stories

7 photos
How Pantone's Colour of the year 2017 Greenery fits our colour predictions

Apple sales and profits soar but investors worry about iPhone reliance, not much news on the Watch

4 photos
London's new immersive art exhibition invites you to step back in time

Graduate Fashion Week 2015: Denim Design Talent

4 photos
London's Design Museum has a new home - and it's brilliantly ambitious